!DOCTYPE html>
living with alpacas
© Terms and conditions apply,Hensting 2019
alpaca facts
males
black alpaca
surefarm

02380 692235

show winning
phone 02380602080
Alpacas
Alpacas
hensting logo
Hensting

Here are some interesting Llama facts you may not know:

Llamas are а part of the camelid family, which includes alpacas, vicunas, guanacos and camels.  The camelid family actually originated from North America about 10 million years ago. Wild vicunas and guanacos emerged from a common ancestor of South American camelid, which migrated to South America about 2.5 million years ago. They still live in the Andes today, while their camel cousins moved to North Africa, the Middle East and central Asia.  The family became extinct in North America about twelve thousand years ago. Llamas along with alpacas were originally domesticated in Peru about six thousand years ago, one of the first аnіmаls domesticated in that area and still being farmed today. Llamas were used in a variety of ways. For food, the meat was both eaten fresh and stored by salting. Many internal organs were used for medicinal purposes. The fibre was used to produce clothing for the general population, with the finer alpaca and vicuna fibre being kept for the nobility. Llamas also played an important role in religious ceremonies, with males and non-breeding females being sacrificed. However, their most important role was for transport. They are capable of carrying large loads over long distances. Males can carry up to 175lb, 80 kg for а day’s march. There are approximately 7 million llamas and alpacas in South America today and their popularity is spreading around the world. In the UK there are now around 50,000 alpacas, though llamas remain less common, currently only approximately 6000. Llamas typically live for 15 to 25 years, though in captivity, some are now living up to 30 years. They weigh between 290 and 440lb (130 and 200kg) and can measure from 5ft 7in to 5ft 11in (1.7 to 1.8m) at the top of their heads. Their fleece is very warm, but also lightweight and comes in a range of solid and spotted colours including black, grey, beige, brown, red and white. Llamas are able to begin breeding between 16 months and 2 years old. They do not have a breeding season, so can mate at any time of year. The pregnancy lasts for 11½ to 12 months.  The female llama will deliver her young while standing up and normally she does not require any help. Llamas usually only have one baby, with twins being very rare. A baby llama is called a cria and weighs between 20 and 35lb at birth. Llamas give birth during the morning, so that the cria is dry, up on its feet and has fed before nightfall. The cria will usually begin feeding within 90 minutes of arrival and stay with its mother until it is weaned at about 6 months old.

Llama or Alpaca – What is the difference?

There are four camelids native to South America: the vicuna, guanaco, llama, аnd аlpаcа.  They are so called because they are essentіаlly camels with no hump.  Vicunas аnd guanacos are normally easier to tell apart, but people can struggle with llamas аnd аlpаcаs. These creatures have several things in common costs, long pointed ears, thick lashes, аnd massive eyes.  But watch out... like camels, they spit, although they are more inclined to do this at each other than at humans.  They don’t have hooves. Instead they have two-toed feet with toenails and soft foot pads. They walk by moving both legs on the same side simultaneously, in a sort of left-right-left march. That’s why they have such a distinctive sway when you ride them. Vicuna and guanaco still live wild, whereas alpaca and llama are domesticated. Llamas The simplest way to recognise a Llama is by its size, they are by far the largest of the four. They are the domesticated form of the guanaco and have similar coarse fleeces. Due to their size and strength, they have been used as primarily as pack animals, to this day being the only form of transportation in the Andes. Their fleeces are used for fibre, in Inca times it was considered only fit for the commoners, due to the coarseness. Droppings are used for building and dried for fuel as well as being used as fertiliser. They are also used for their meat. They have also been found to be very effective as guard animals.

Alpacas

Alpacas are a lot smaller than llamas, weighing between 100 and 175lbs and standing between 47-59 inches tall. They have a much softer luxurious fleece. The other notable difference between llamas and alpacas is their ears. Alpaca ears are pear shaped and symmetrical, whereas are much longer and curve inwards, looking a bit like bananas. Alpacas typically have a top-knot, whereas llamas fleece lies flatter on the top of their heads. Alpacas are the domesticated form of vicuna, which are smaller still. It is from the vicuna that alpacas get the fineness in their fleece. Alpaca fleece is one of the most desired fibres in the world, it is softer and warmer than lamb’s wool, harder wearing than cashmere and also hypo-allergenic. There are two breeds of alpaca, the Huacaya, with a fluffy, teddy bear like fleece and the longer haired Suri. During the walk, feel free to take pictures of the animals and of the natural scenery; we also take lots of pictures and post them up to our social network sites, since those who have already visited us or enjoyed this walking adventure, often ask us to post new pictures of ‘their Llama’, whom they somehow miss even after just one meeting! Indeed, many families return time and time again, building a friendship with us and a very special bond with the alpacas and of course Primrose the llama.
Hensting Alpacas Limited, Kiln Ln, Brambridge, Otterbourne, Eastleigh, Hampshire SO50 6HT 07876234399

Llama Keeper experience come and take care of Primrose the Llama New for 2020

New for 2019 Llama Keeper with our latest addition at Hensting Alpacas, Primrose the llama. Primrose is 18 months old at the time of writing (September 2019) and has been trained over the winter months of 2018. She is ready to meet you!  She is an amazing girl and she towers over her friends the alpacas. Come and be the keeper at Hensting Alpacas.  You will have a member of staff totally to your selves. You will accompany them around the farm and muck in with the jobs as follows:

How do I look after the Llama?

9am start, first job meet the staff and introduction to your trainer Help put out hay around the farm and (poo pick 15 mins max) Meet the llama and give her and the alpacas their feeds Take photos for social media Take Primrose for a short gentle slow walk around the land, while being taught all about her, llamas in general and of course the alpacas here in the UK and their native lands. A short tea break (bring pic-nic if you wish) A few more photos then a browse around the little shop and away by 12:15ish Otterbourne is a small secluded village were the chalk streams meander along ancient river beds, to the sea 11 miles away. We own 12 acres of grasslands alongside The Itchen Navigation; this part of the river was used years ago to transport goods by barge to Winchester, London and beyond.  We do not see any boats on the river now, they have long gone.  Wildlife has returned to the quiet environment as we have otter, swan, kingfisher, dragonfly and all manner of birds, insects and butterflies. MORNING Keeper 2 people 1 Llama £80 Special The gates close at 10:00am so please do not be late 2 people 1 Llama £80 inc vat Special 9am - 12:15pm Book carefully Cancellations or moving dates if accepted will result in a £10 rebooking fee for administration and must be requested 72hrs before the date of experience MORNING Keeper 2 people 1 Llama £80 Special The gates close at 10:00am so please do not be late 2 people 1 Llama £80 inc vat Special 10am - 12:15pm Book carefully  Cancellations or moving dates if accepted will result in a £10 re booking fee for administration and only if before 72hrs of walk Ts and Cs Wellington boots are available to hire when it is muddy Kiln Lane Brambridge Eastleigh Hampshire SO50 6HT (this post code will take you to the garden centre next door) Outside Southern Water Gates Lay-by just on left, before railway bridge when travelling west down Kiln Lane Or from Brambridge Park gardens, turn left out of their gates, travel over 2 hump bridges and you will see a lay-by on left with tall iron gates (if you go under the railway line, you have gone too far). A representative from Hensting Llamas will be at the Parking facilities are on site and you will be directed where to park from the entrance gates.
Alpaca Walking
Alpaca walking experience Alpaca walking experience Hampshire alpaca walking Hampshire

A certificate will be issued once paid for via email

A Great Christmas or Birthday present

Gift Vouchers Now available £80inc vat A great idea for a loved one! to come  and meet the alpacas & Llamas and be the keeper Booking Tool Booking Tool Sample

Llama Walking Hampshire Llama Trekking  Llama experience

walking alpacas alpaca trekking
Llama Keeper

Llama Keeper Morning| Hensting Alpacas

christmas alpaca walking
VAT NUMBER 3216272 32
© Terms and conditions apply,Hensting Alpacas 2019
Amiryck Dill stud alpaca
HenstingAlpacas Limited

02380 692235

quality stock
call us
Alpaca Drinking Boots Hats Water Sun Cream Smiley Face
Female alpacas
dark alpacas
female alpacas for sale
trekking with Llamas
Alpacas
livestock animals
Hensting

A certificate will be issued once paid for via email

Gift Vouchers Now available £60.95  A great idea for a loved one! to come  and meet the alpacas & Llama Booking tool Book Here
surefarm
click here for Gift vouchers & booking

Here are some interesting Llama facts you may not know:

Llamas are а part of the camelid family, which includes alpacas, vicunas, guanacos and camels.  The camelid family actually originated from North America about 10 million years ago. Wild vicunas and guanacos emerged from a common ancestor of South American camelid, which migrated to South America about 2.5 million years ago. They still live in the Andes today, while their camel cousins moved to North Africa, the Middle East and central Asia.  The family became extinct in North America about twelve thousand years ago. Llamas along with alpacas were originally domesticated in Peru about six thousand years ago, one of the first аnіmаls domesticated in that area and still being farmed today. Llamas were used in a variety of ways. For food, the meat was both eaten fresh and stored by salting. Many internal organs were used for medicinal purposes. The fibre was used to produce clothing for the general population, with the finer alpaca and vicuna fibre being kept for the nobility. Llamas also played an important role in religious ceremonies, with males and non-breeding females being sacrificed. However, their most important role was for transport. They are capable of carrying large loads over long distances. Males can carry up to 175lb, 80 kg for а day’s march. There are approximately 7 million llamas and alpacas in South America today and their popularity is spreading around the world. In the UK there are now around 50,000 alpacas, though llamas remain less common, currently only approximately 6000. Llamas typically live for 15 to 25 years, though in captivity, some are now living up to 30 years. They weigh between 290 and 440lb (130 and 200kg) and can measure from 5ft 7in to 5ft 11in (1.7 to 1.8m) at the top of their heads. Their fleece is very warm, but also lightweight and comes in a range of solid and spotted colours including black, grey, beige, brown, red and white. Llamas are able to begin breeding between 16 months and 2 years old. They do not have a breeding season, so can mate at any time of year. The pregnancy lasts for 11½ to 12 months.  The female llama will deliver her young while standing up and normally she does not require any help. Llamas usually only have one baby, with twins being very rare. A baby llama is called a cria and weighs between 20 and 35lb at birth. Llamas give birth during the morning, so that the cria is dry, up on its feet and has fed before nightfall. The cria will usually begin feeding within 90 minutes of arrival and stay with its mother until it is weaned at about 6 months old.

Llama or Alpaca – What is the difference?

There are four camelids native to South America: the vicuna, guanaco, llama, аnd аlpаcа.  They are so called because they are essentіаlly camels with no hump.  Vicunas аnd guanacos are normally easier to tell apart, but people can struggle with llamas аnd аlpаcаs. These creatures have several things in common costs, long pointed ears, thick lashes, аnd massive eyes.  But watch out... like camels, they spit, although they are more inclined to do this at each other than at humans.  They don’t have hooves. Instead they have two-toed feet with toenails and soft foot pads. They walk by moving both legs on the same side simultaneously, in a sort of left-right-left march. That’s why they have such a distinctive sway when you ride them. Vicuna and guanaco still live wild, whereas alpaca and llama are domesticated. Llamas The simplest way to recognise a Llama is by its size, they are by far the largest of the four. They are the domesticated form of the guanaco and have similar coarse fleeces. Due to their size and strength, they have been used as primarily as pack animals, to this day being the only form of transportation in the Andes. Their fleeces are used for fibre, in Inca times it was considered only fit for the commoners, due to the coarseness. Droppings are used for building and dried for fuel as well as being used as fertiliser. They are also used for their meat. They have also been found to be very effective as guard animals.

Alpacas

Alpacas are a lot smaller than llamas, weighing between 100 and 175lbs and standing between 47-59 inches tall. They have a much softer luxurious fleece. The other notable difference between llamas and alpacas is their ears. Alpaca ears are pear shaped and symmetrical, whereas are much longer and curve inwards, looking a bit like bananas. Alpacas typically have a top-knot, whereas llamas fleece lies flatter on the top of their heads. Alpacas are the domesticated form of vicuna, which are smaller still. It is from the vicuna that alpacas get the fineness in their fleece. Alpaca fleece is one of the most desired fibres in the world, it is softer and warmer than lamb’s wool, harder wearing than cashmere and also hypo-allergenic. There are two breeds of alpaca, the Huacaya, with a fluffy, teddy bear like fleece and the longer haired Suri. During the walk, feel free to take pictures of the animals and of the natural scenery; we also take lots of pictures and post them up to our social network sites, since those who have already visited us or enjoyed this walking adventure, often ask us to post new pictures of ‘their Llama’, whom they somehow miss even after just one meeting! Indeed, many families return time and time again, building a friendship with us and a very special bond with the alpacas and of course Primrose the llama.
VAT NUMBER 321 6272 32

Llama Keeper experience come and take care of

Primrose the Llama New for 2020

New for 2019 Llama Keeper with our latest addition at Hensting Alpacas, Primrose the llama. Primrose is 18 months old at the time of writing (September 2019) and has been trained over the winter months of 2018. She is ready to meet you!  She is an amazing girl and she towers over her friends the alpacas. Come and be the keeper at Hensting Alpacas.  You will have a member of staff totally to your selves. You will accompany them around the farm and muck in with the jobs as follows:

How do I look after the Llama?

9am start, first job meet the staff and introduction to your trainer Help put out hay around the farm and (poo pick 15 mins max) Meet the llama and give her and the alpacas their feeds Take photos for social media Take Primrose for a short gentle slow walk around the land, while being taught all about her, llamas in general and of course the alpacas here in the UK and their native lands. A short tea break (bring pic-nic if you wish) A few more photos then a browse around the little shop and away by 12:15ish Otterbourne is a small secluded village were the chalk streams meander along ancient river beds, to the sea 11 miles away. We own 12 acres of grasslands alongside The Itchen Navigation; this part of the river was used years ago to transport goods by barge to Winchester, London and beyond.  We do not see any boats on the river now, they have long gone.  Wildlife has returned to the quiet environment as we have otter, swan, kingfisher, dragonfly and all manner of birds, insects and butterflies. MORNING Keeper 2 people 1 Llama £80 Special The gates close at 10:00am so please do not be late 2 people 1 Llama £80 inc vat Special 9am - 12:15pm Book carefully Cancellations or moving dates if accepted will result in a £10 rebooking fee for administration and must be requested 72hrs before the date of experience MORNING Keeper 2 people 1 Llama £80 Special The gates close at 10:00am so please do not be late 2 people 1 Llama £80 inc vat Special 10am - 12:15pm Book carefully  Cancellations or moving dates if accepted will result in a £10 re booking fee for administration and only if before 72hrs of walk Ts and Cs Wellington boots are available to hire when it is muddy Kiln Lane Brambridge Eastleigh Hampshire SO50 6HT (this post code will take you to the garden centre next door) Outside Southern Water Gates Lay-by just on left, before railway bridge when travelling west down Kiln Lane Or from Brambridge Park gardens, turn left out of their gates, travel over 2 hump bridges and you will see a lay-by on left with tall iron gates (if you go under the railway line, you have gone too far). A representative from Hensting Llamas will be at the Parking facilities are on site and you will be directed where to park from the entrance gates.
Alpaca Walking